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Identity,individuality, responsibility

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Topic: Identity,individuality, responsibility

Learning Outcomes

Learn to respect others identities, cultures and individuality

Understand what an identity is

Understand the term racism

 

 

 

Introduction

Reading of story “Racism and intolerance” by Louise Spilsbury Hanane Kai

Higher/lower order questioning of story  including listing examples of

Discussion of term racism, what it means, where does racism exist in the story and if it exists in real life.

 

 

 

Development

Walking debate: Scenarios of people disrespecting/respecting others identities will be read aloud. The children will have to move and stand beside the strongly agree,agree,neither agree nor disagree,disagree and strongly disagree signs depending on whether they agree/disagree with the statement.

Sample of scenarios include:

“There is a child of a different race playing in the playground on their own, it is okay to ignore them and play on their own because they look different”

The children will be asked why they are standing under the various headings.

Me too game:

A statement will be called out and each child that it applies to has to step forward and say “me too”. Many statements will be real aloud so that the children all say “me too” several times. Discussion will take place on how although we have many things in common we all have differences also and how it is important to respect each others differences.

Discussion will take place on how someone would feel if someone did not respect these differences and laughed, mocked or ignored them because of them. E.g. embarrassed,upset,ashamed,depressed etc.

Plenary

The children will work in pairs to write down reasons on why it is important to respect others identities. They will write these on sticky notes which they will stick on the board.

The sticky notes will be read aloud to recap on the importance of identity and respecting others individuality.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

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Autism awareness

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Topic: Autism awareness

Learning Outcomes

The child shall be enabled to:

  • further develop the concept of responsibility towards each other (Moral and Spiritual Development Strand)
  • explore rights and responsibilities in relation to the other children in the school and the contribution they can make to ensure these rights are upheld (Equality and Justice Strand)

 

Introduction

Circle Time Discussion:

  • Introduce the idea that we all have some things in common and that we are also unique.
  • What do we have in common?
  • What makes each of us unique?
  • Pass a speaking object around the circle and give each child an opportunity to answer each of these questions.

Development

Video about autism

  • Introduce the video – we will watch a video about how people view the world differently.
  • Show the video ‘Amazing Things Happen When’ : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbwRrVw-CRo
  • Think, pair share: ask the children to name one thing they learned from the video.
  • Explain that some people have autism which means they experience the world differently and can find some situations overwhelming.

Plenary

Ways to show respect for others

  • Brainstorm different ways we can show empathy and respect for people, particularly those with autism.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

Amazing Things Happen When video available on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbwRrVw-CRo

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Have you filled a bucket today?

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Topic:

Have you filled a bucket today?

LT focus:

  • Anti-bullying
  • Respect
  • Kindness

Introduction

  • Discuss how we can make our classroom, our school, our homes etc. a nice place to be.
  • Read a story called Have You Filled a Bucket Today? By Carol McCloud to the class.

Development

  • Tell students that the word bucket is used to describe our emotional self. If the bucket is full, we are happy. If the bucket is empty, we are sad.
  • Review key ideas from the story, focusing on positive and negative comments. Positive comments are those that are uplifting and make people feel good, while negative comments are put-downs and do not make people feel good about themselves.
  • Point out that every interaction we have with people either fills or empties their buckets
  • Pass out examples of “Bucket Fillers” and “Bucket Dippers”.  E.g. Saying good morning to your teacher or classmates. (Filler).  Hurting someone with your hands (Dipper)
  • Give each student a turn to come up to the anchor chart and place their label in the correct column.
  • Discuss what makes each a bucket filler or dipper and why.  If it is a bucket dipper, discuss what could be done instead to make it a bucket filler.  

Plenary

  • Either at the end of the lesson or the next day, ask students to share the “Bucket Filling” activities that they are noticing and how they made them feel. Ask how they felt when they filled a bucket.  If anyone experienced “Bucket Dipping,” ask how that made them feel.
  • Once the students have understood the Bucket Filler concept, Each student could be given a bucket in the class where their classmates could place bucket filler note. An additional lesson could be done on the rules of writing bucket filler notes.

Other teacher resources for teaching this topic:

Resources

PDF version of the story – Have you filled a bucket today?

http://www.easton.k12.ma.us/document_center/moreau/Have_You_Filled_a_Bucket_Today.pdf

Video of the story.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2r9pAd4bE8