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Humanism – Summer Solstice June 21st

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Topic: Humanism – Summer Solstice June 21st

Learning Outcomes

To develop an understanding and appreciation of an event that is of particular significance to Humanist religion.
Identify and discuss famous features in Ireland and abroad that are related to the summer solstice.

 

Introduction

Introduce the Summer solstice, the date of the 21st of June and why it is of significance.
Discuss the relevance of it being the longest day of the year and compare it with the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year. Represent the solistice as a cycle that repeats annually.

https://study.com/academy/lesson/summer-solstice-lesson-for-kids.html

Website can be used as a prompt to learn about the basics of the Summer solstice.

Development

Group work:

Break the children into groups and assign them a task to research famous features that celebrate the summer solstice.
The groups will be looking  up two different places; Newgrange and Stonehenge.

The group who are researching Newgrange can use this website and youtube video to conduct their research;

https://easyscienceforkids.com/newgrange-facts/

Children who are researching Stonehenge can use this website and video to conduct their research;

Stonehenge Facts!

Each group will present their research to the class using a poster or record a short video presentation on iPads.

places

Plenary

The lesson can then be linked to the religion of Humanism by acknowledging that World Humanism Day is celebrated on the 21st of June. A discussion on the meaning of the summer solstice and the core values of humanism.

This video may be used by the teacher to attain some knowledge on the day or else be shown to the children.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DoaC0cWfneM

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

use of websites, videos and iPads.

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Naming ceremonies

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Topic: Naming ceremonies

Learning Outcomes

Exploring the rites and ceremonies associated with a variety of belief systems

 

Introduction

To introduce the lesson, I will ask a few of the children their names, I will then ask them where they got their names from and if  they celebrated it (to elicit baptism etc.) I will then begin to discuss how special and important our names are to us. I will share with  the children that I am named after my Aunt. The children will share any stories they have about where their name comes from and if they have any nicknames with a partner and then report back to the class.

Development

I will then explain that different religions have different celebrations  when they are naming a baby. We will go through a PowerPoint all about Christianity and baptism. I will place emphasis on key things involved e.g. holy water, candle,  gown etc. I will show them my candle from my baptism. I will ask the class if they have ever attended a baptism and to share their experiences (a few have recently been to baby  sibling’s baptisms). After this we will discuss baptism and look at a word mat with all key words and images on it.

Plenary

The children will  then design their own name leaves to be later displayed. They will draw things that they like on their name leaves to show their uniqueness.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

The next two lessons would focus on the naming ceremonies in Buddhism and hinduism and comparing all  three for similarities and differences.

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Summer Solstice

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Topic:

Summer Solstice

LT focus: Examine the links between religious rites and ceremonies and their beginnings in older traditions such as the Summer Solstice.

Introduction

Using Padlet, the children recall some celebrations that are date related? What are the celebrations and on which dates do they fall?

As the celebrations appear on the IWB, quickly discuss the religion in which they appear or what significance they hold.

The children will be learning about the Summer Solstice. Highlight that the Summer Solstice is celebrated by humanists, agnostics and atheists (Can the children recall what these terms mean?)

Since prehistory, the summer solstice has been seen as a significant time of year in many cultures, and has been marked by festivals and rituals. Traditionally, in many temperate regions (especially Europe), the summer solstice is seen as the middle of summer and referred to as “midsummer”. Today, however, in some countries and calendars it is seen as the beginning of summer.

Also, Summer Solstice (June 21st) is also World Humanist Day.

Development

Day 1: Focusing on the sun, the children will access

http://solar-center.stanford.edu/folklore/#nativeam

These stories are culturally significant and focus on the sun.

In groups of 2/3 the children are to create short playscripts using Google Docs with the story of their choosing as a base for their play.

Plenary

Day 2: The children will practice and rehearse their play with a view to performing these and/or recording them. Children can organise their own props and costumes id they so wish.

Day 3/4 : The children perform their short plays for the class/ assembly

Other teacher resources for teaching this topic:

Some of the stories from the website are aimed at children, whilst others are reflections of cultural beliefs. Some stories may be deemed inappropriate and it is important that teachers review the stories beforehand.

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Humanism

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Topic:

Humanism

LT focus: Lesson 1

  • Attempt to locate common values across the traditions
  • Appreciate that Humanists believe in evidence-based investigation

Introduction

  • What is Humanism or what does it mean to be a Humanist?
  • What are our senses? Why are they important?
  • People use their senses to find out about their surroundings and themselves. Different senses give different information.
  • Teacher explains that Humanists believe in what they can see, hear, touch, taste or smell.
  • How do we know what we know?

Development

  • Children are split into groups of 4: Children must come up with 4 facts based on the evidence of their senses.
  • Groups report back to the class.
  • The children then (in groups) must design a symbol that would represent Humanism as the cross represents Christianity, or the Star of David represents Judaism.
  • The children could use cameras and photographic software to incorporate ideas into their symbol.
  • These designs could be completed on paper or an appropriate drawing app on a ipads.

Plenary

  • The children share their designs with the group and explain why they chose their design.
  • What feelings/ senses have they included into their designs?
  • Share the real symbol for Humanism and see which group have the closest resemblance

LT focus: Lesson 2

-Attempt to locate common values across the traditions

-Appreciate that Humanism relies upon evidence based investigation

Introduction

The children could try and remember what the basis of Humanism was.

Today we will be learning about the 3 precepts of humanism.

Look at the slides below. Can the children remember which symbols match the religion

Development

What is Humanism?

How do they apply to everyday life a political action?

Us the grid below (onto card)  and cut them up.

Which values are religious? Which are not?

Use a Venn diagram to place the cards in small groups.

Plenary

To conclude, can the children remember the 3 Humanist concepts?

In small groups, ask the children to check their Google Classroom assignment page where there will be a BBC clip on Humanism (presented by Sandi Toksvig)

https://youtu.be/549zn2nJpdU

Other teacher resources for teaching this topic:

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Naming Ceremonies across the World

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Topic:

Naming ceremonies across the World

LT focus: Learn the rites of passage across societies

Introduction

In a circle time form, ask the children how they came to have their name.

Are they named after family members? Does their name come from the time of their birth? Is there name a traditional name? Does their name have a meaning?

During which ceremony (if any) was their name made official? Baptism? Krustaba (Latvian)? Itiq (innuit)?

Ask the children to bring in photos of their ceremony for display in the Learn Together corner

Development

For this lesson the children will be exploring the different naming ceremonies performed across the globe.

Give each group of 2/3 an envelope containing a different ceremony/ ritual.

Such as (but not limited to):

  • Australian/ Aborigine
  • Buddhist
  • Chinese
  • Christian
  • Hindu
  • Humanist
  • Innuit
  • Jewish
  • Latvia
  • Muslim
  • Nigerian Yoruba
  • Pagan
  • Sikh

The children could create a short and quick Pages document to share with the class later in the week.

These should include Photos, testimonials, costumes, traditions, etc

Plenary

The children could present their findings to the class or to an assembly

Other teacher resources for teaching this topic:

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Humanism – Summer Solstice

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Topic:

Humanism – Summer Solstice

LT focus:

  • Recall various celebrations studied to date and their corresponding religions.
  • Discuss some common ways in which we celebrate.
  • Investigate the school surroundings using the five senses.
  • Compose a question for explanation writing prompted by the outdoors.

Introduction

In class:

  • Recall various celebrations studied to date and their corresponding religions.
  • Discuss/note on the board some common ways in which we celebrate.
  • Highlight the summer solstice as a day celebrated by many people, including humanists, agnostics and atheists. Note that the 21st June is also World Humanist Day.
  • Discuss what the children already know about non religions such as humanists, atheists and agnostics.

Development

Outdoors:

  • Introduce the sensory wheel to the children and explain how the class will used their senses to fill the wheel.
  • For the tasting segment of the wheel set up some bowls of summer fruits at the picnic area for the children to taste.
  • Encourage the pairs to close their eyes and guess the fruits their partner gives them.
  • Tell the class that you would also like them to look around the outdoors for something that they would like explained.
  • Give examples of questions to clarify what is being requested.

-Why are leaves green?

-How do bees make honey?

-Why are birds beaks pointed?

-What species of butterflies do we have in Ireland?

  • Allow the children to freely explore their surroundings to fill their wheel and to inform their question.

Plenary

Outdoors:

  • Listen and respond to some examples of what the children’s senses discovered for each of the five senses.
  • Listen and respond to some examples of questions the children would like to have explained. (These will be researched and explained by the children in a follow up English lesson.)
  • Celebrate the day by having a class picnic with the children’s lunch outdoors.

Other teacher resources for teaching this topic:

Differentiation:

  • Activities – Pupil A can draw instead of writing on the senses wheel.
  • Resources – Question sheet will include examples to aid pupil A.
  • Assistance – Peer assistance/Cooperative task.
  • Product – Variance in the complexity of the questions for explanation writing according to abilities.

Resources:

  • Clipboards
  • Senses wheel worksheet and paper to compose a question
  • Variety of chopped summer fruits
  • Children’s own lunch for a picnic
  • Class camera

Linkage

  • Ethics and the Environment – Knowledge and Awareness of Environmental issues – A lesson on waste management in our school surroundings

Integration

  • English – Writing – Explanation writing
  • S.E.S.E. – Science and the environment/Human Life/Plants and animals/Caring for the environment
  • S.P.H.E – Developing citizenship/Knowing about my body/Food and nutrition/Environmental Care
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Humanism and Atheism

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Topic:

Humanism and Atheism

LT focus: To introduce the pupils to Humanism and Atheism

Introduction

Group Discussion- What is the best colour and why?

In pairs the children discuss and  share their ideas with the class.

The teacher asks the following questions:

Did everyone choose the same colour?

Why not?

Is that okay?

The teacher explains that Humanists ask questions and find out answers for themselves and not from a God or Gods. Atheists are also a group who don’t believe in God but rely on themselves to ask and answer questions about the world. Some Atheists call themselves Humanists and some Humanists call themselves Atheists, but not always.

Development

The teacher reads the story : The First Snow

Think , Pair, Share

What did you learn from the story?

What questions did the characters ask?

Did everyone come up with the same answer?

Why do you think they didn’t?

Who do you think had the correct answer and why?

Plenary

What do you think when you hear answers that are very different to your own?

What’s the best thing to do?

Teacher reminds pupils that Humanists believe that people should find out information for themselves and learn about the world  in their own way.

Group discussion: What have we learned today? How could we learn more about Humaism/Atheism? What ideas do you have?

Other teacher resources for teaching this topic:

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Humanism

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Topic:

Humanism

Learning Outcomes

  • To recognise that Humanists ask the same questions as other groups.
  • To explore how we can all come up with different answers to the same questions.
  • To reflect on how we can find answers to our questions.

Introduction

Teacher explains ‘what we’re going to learn today’ Senior Infant children may need all or only some of the following information.

Humanists ask questions about the world around them and come up with answers by themselves and not from a god or gods.

Atheists are also a group that does not believe in a god or gods. Sometimes atheists call themselves Humanists and sometimes they don’t and sometimes Humanists call themselves atheist and sometimes they don’t.

Write on board “What is the best colour and why, do you think this?” Children think-pair-share and then share with class.

Teacher asks: Did everyone come up with the same answer? Why not? Is that okay?

Development

Story: Teacher reads the story ‘The First Snow’.

Think-pair-share: The teacher leads a discussion on how the children in the story all had different ideas about where the snow came from.

Questions could include: ● What did you learn from the story ‘The First Snow’? ● What questions did the characters ask? ● Did everyone come up with the same answer? ● Why do you think they didn’t? ● Who do you think had the correct answer? Why?

Plenary

Conclusion Reflection: Think-pair-share ● What do you think when you hear answers that you don’t agree with or that are very different to your own? ● What’s the best thing to do? Teacher reminds children that Humanists believe people should ask questions and find out the answers for themselves. Teacher concludes the discussion by asking the children what they have learned about Humanism today

This lesson plan was taken and adapted from the Educate Together lesson plans for 1st/2nd class on humanism-Lesson 1-You will find the story “the first snow” here alongside many other excellent lessons that can be adapted for Infants.

https://www.educatetogether.ie/humanism-lessons




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Humanism / Atheism

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Topic:

Humanism / Atheism

LT focus:

To recognise that Humanists have asked the same questions as other groups.

To understand that Humanists believe that we have one life and that we should live it to the full.

To evaluate what it means to be our best self.

Introduction

The teacher introduces the lesson with a recap of the major world religions and beliefs as well as including other religions featuring in the class/wider school. The class look at images of various followers of these religions. The children identify differences and similarities between these groups.

The teacher then shows the children a photograph of Stephen Fry.

Who is this man?

What do we know about him?

Is he a religious man?

What does he believe in?

Development

Small group discussion – what is a humanist/what does a humanist believe?

Videos – humanism.org

‘How do we know what is true?’

‘What should we think about death?’

‘What makes something right or wrong?’

‘How can I be happy?

Plenary

Small group/pair discussion on Humanism – similarities with other groups, why do Humanists think it’s important to ask questions, what can we do to live our best lives and be our best selves.

End lesson with short small group presentations to class on discussions.

Other teacher resources for teaching this topic:

Video clips: https://humanism.org.uk/thatshumanism/