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Universal Declaration of Human Rights

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Topic: Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Learning Outcomes

  1. To develop an awareness of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
  2. To enable the children to appreciate its relevance today.
  3. To identify what rights are the most important to them and the rationale behind their choice.

 

Introduction

  1. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=xevGz8_MBKk  Teacher shows the children the video entitled ‘ The Price of Silence’. S(he) asks the students a number of questions e.g. Why do you think this video was produced? What message do you think the producers were trying  to communicate?
  2. Teacher solicits students’ prior knowledge of the UDHR.

Development

1. Children are divided into groups of six where each child is provided with a copy of a child friendly version of the UDHR.

  1. They are asked to do the following:

(A) Read the document.
(B) Discuss what are the five most important rights included in this document.
(C) Rank these rights in order of importance.
(D) Explain why they decided on these five rights.

 

 

 

Plenary

Each group is invited to share their conclusions with the rest of the class by nominating a spokesperson to speak on their behalf.

  • The teacher collates the responses on the IWB, identifying the overlap in terms of rights chosen & the assigned ranking.
  • The teacher asks the groups to review their conclusions on the rights chosen and ranking based on the whole class discussion.

    The teacher asks children what changes, if any, would they make to the UNHR to make it more relevant, probing the rationale behind their suggestions.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

http://www.eycb.coe.int/compasito/chapter_6/pdf/1.pdf

  1. Children could work on iPads to collate the output of their group work through mentimeter.
  2. In another class e.g. music the children could write and perform a rap to promote awareness of the UDHR in school.

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Halloween

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Topic: Halloween

Learning Outcomes

-understand the purpose and joy of celebration

-explore special celebrations that we share with others

-begin to explore festivals in different cultures

-To discuss what we already know

-To discuss the origins of a popular festival

– To carry out research

 

Introduction

Discuss Halloween – complete a KWL chart with whole class. Why do we celebrate it? Where does the tradition come from? Samhain etc.

Development

Children to research different aspects of Halloween on the Chromebooks in small groups. Eg. Traditional games, costumes, where and why it started, reason for pumpkins etc.
Children will then make a mini project in their group on their topic. They will present them to the class.
Children to do some art based on Halloween – clay pumpkins.
Children to play some traditional Halloween games in class – bobbing for apples etc.

Plenary

Children to fill in what I have learned part of the KWL chart and present their projects and clay pumpkins to another class.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

Using Chromebooks for research

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Rites of Passage

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Topic: Rites of Passage

Learning Outcomes

  • to identify different naming ceremonies around the world
  • to establish that not all races / religions celebrate rites of passage in the same way.

 

Introduction

Ask the children do they know what ceremony or ritual means.

Inquire if they know any ceremonies or rituals. Can they name the religion or culture they belong to?

Do they think it is just religious ceremonies that are Rites of Passage? Can there be other types?

 

Development

Explain that a lot of the rites are religious but that they can be spiritual or part of human development  too (like puberty). They mark a time when an individual leaves one group to enter another and that is separated into three stages: separation, transition and incorporation.

Explain that they can also be called “initiation” rites.

Show them examples of:

puberty, bar and bat Mitzvah, Quinceanera, sweet sixteen, Masai – Emorata, vision quest (Native American), Amrit Sanchar, Baptism, Communion, Confirmation, the Hajj, Samskaras,.

 

After learning about these, ask the children, in groups, to come up with their own idea for a rite of passage. When would it happen? Who would it happen to? how old do you need to be?

 

Plenary

Let the children act out their “rites” and the other groups can ask questions about it.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

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Holi Festival

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Topic: Holi Festival

Learning Outcomes

The child shall be enabled to:
• look at how different festivals are celebrated
• categorise and distinguish between festivals e.g. festivals of light and festivals of darkness
• examine the art and music associated with the celebration of these festivals

 

Introduction

Write the word “festival” on the whiteboard. Discuss what this means. Make a list of festivals, suggested by the class.

Holi is a festival celebrated by hindu’s. Can you remember any other festivals celebrated in this belief system? (Divali). It is celebrated in March, marking the start of spring in the Hindu calendar

Show a picture of Holi festival being celebrated. Discuss (in groups or as a whole class).

tell the story of Holi festival (see youtube video below).

 

 

Development

Children draw a self portrait on  white page.

Each child has a paintbrush with a colour of their choice on it. Pass you self portrait to others at your table so they can dab their paint on to your picture, sharing their colour.

 

listen to Holi festival music while they work on their art.

 

 

 

 

Plenary

Children can then retell the story of Holi in their own words.

 

 

 

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mp8p3wYzhTo

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The Lorax

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Topic: The Lorax

Learning Outcomes

  • By engaging in this lesson, children will be enabled to understand the importance of the world’s forests, and that trees are a resource we need to survive
  • Children will identify effects of deforestation and how we our habits contribute to the process
  • Children will be enabled to conceptualize practical ways to help reduce their own carbon footprint, and how to implement these methods in their day-to-day lives

 

Introduction

  • Show pupils the first “The Lorax” clip – did you chop down this tree?- to introduce the topic of mass deforestation. Ask them to consider the following whilst watching:
    • Why does the lorax try to stop him cutting down the trees?
    • Are the man’s actions good for the environment? Why/Why not?
    • What do you think will happen next?
    • Who do you think will be affected by the cutting down of trees?
  • Put questions back on board and ask to discuss in groups  – ask for a few examples from each group

Development

  • Show the second clip – the last seed – and ask them to consider the following:
    • How have the man’s actions damaged the environment?
    • Do you think it’s important for the boy to plant the seed?
  • In context for our own environment – discuss: does anything like this happen in our world? Why? Allow for suggestions – the Amazon, etc
  • Show slideshow of nature pictures  (lush forests, wildfires, logging; selection of 4/5)- explain photo, whole class vote and discussion on whether the contents of the picture depict scenes that are good or bad for the environment/ and wildlife

Plenary

  • In small groups,  children decorate an A2 poster to be displayed in the classroom and around the classroom, depicting what they can do in school and in their home lives to help protect trees both locally and worldwide.
  • Alternatively, children can work in groups to create a leaflet on publisher and publish these to the school wesbite/social media

Can extend to include the envirnomental impacts of overusing palm oil – Animal Habitat loss (focus on orangutans)

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nNgHSJNbEE

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Autism Awareness Day

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Topic: Autism Awareness Day

Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes:

The child will be enabled to:

  • identify things which make each child unique
  • understand more about Autism and that people are born with autism
  • begin to identify some of the characteristics associated with people with autism, but that all people with autism are different
  • identify some of the ways in which people with autism may respond to various stimuli

 

Introduction

Unique: Pupils have a discussion about what makes them unique – what they like, dislike, what they are good at, what they find challenging.

 

Autism: Teacher introduces the word ‘autism’ and asks the class if they have ever heard the word before, or if they know anything about it.

 

 

 

Development

Teacher defines what autism is and discusses how people with autism are born with it and that autism affects the way their brain works.

 

Video: pupils watch a video about autism and how a child with autism may behave in certain situations.

 

Language: Pupils learn that people with autism may make their voice heard through pictoral systems, communication devices, apps.

 

Stimuli stations: pupils rotate around various stimuli stations (feeling jelly, playing with sand, listening to noise etc.) Pupils discuss which stimuli they liked/didn’t like. They can begin to realise that everyone has different preferences and it is due to their brain telling them how to respond. For a person with autism, their senses can be heightened and it can be difficult for them to be comfortable around certain sounds, smells, tastes, touches.

Plenary

Circle: pupils come together to discuss what they have learned about autism and the importance of autism awareness. Discuss how lack of understanding or awareness may have a negative impact of somebody with autism.

 

If applicable, classes could visit ASD unit in their school to learn about the various resources available to support the children in their day-to-day life.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

Information for teacher: https://autism.ie/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtRYKjucDHk&disable_polymer=true

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXwxmMKBzWk

 

 

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Migration

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Topic: Migration

Learning Outcomes

The child shall be enabled to:

  • identify and name basic rights e.g. the right to food, water, shelter, health, play, to be safe, not to be hurt etc.
  • describe what makes a home feel safe/unsafe
  • identify the reasons why people might migrate

 

Introduction

Discuss different types of homes and what makes our homes feel safe.

Introduce concept of migration and put up poster with a definition.

Development

Using the book/posters ‘If the World Were a Village’, introduce concepts of inequality in the world.

Discuss reasons that people might choose to/need to leave their homes.

In a whole-school setting, create artwork to represent different cultures/backgrounds of people in Ireland.

 

Plenary

Display the artwork in a prominent space/use as the focal point for an assembly on this topic.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

Book: ‘If the World Were a Village’ by by David J Smith and Shelagh Armstrong

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What is a conscience?

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Topic: What is a conscience?

Learning Outcomes

  • To know what a conscience is.
  • To develop empathy.
  • To understand right from wrong.

 

Introduction

  • Stimulus: YouTube Link (Conscience Alley video)
  • Higher and Lower order questioning about the video.
  • Prior Knowledge – relate questions to life experiences/situations .
  • Use of WALT and WILF to share the intended learning outcomes of today’s lesson.

Development

  • Write a situation on the board – Your in the middle of reaching a high score on the video game. Your dad tells you to turn off the video game and do your homework. You pretend you don’t hear him. Would you listen to him or go against him?
  • Inform the students of the situation and discuss with the class – What do they think? For or against?
  • The class will be divided into groups of for and against.
  • The class teacher picks a student to walk down the formed alley in the classroom. The ‘for’ and ‘against’ groups stand directly across from each other .
  • The student walks down the conscience alley to listen to every student as they give their opinion.
  • The students listens to each opinion, as they arrive to the end of the alley, ‘he/she’ makes a decision on whether they are ‘for’ or ‘against’ the situation and explains why.
  • All the students go back to their seats to discuss the right from the wrong in that situation.
  • Write down what their ‘conscience’ or ‘thought’ was.

Plenary

  • The teacher will ask what was learned in today’s lesson – New words, new thoughts, have they ever being in a situation of ‘choice’ like that before.
  • The teacher will ask two students to collect the written work.
  • Tidy for next lesson.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYxUvNpYXuo

  • Interactive Whiteboard
  • YouTube video

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Identity,individuality, responsibility

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Topic: Identity,individuality, responsibility

Learning Outcomes

Learn to respect others identities, cultures and individuality

Understand what an identity is

Understand the term racism

 

 

 

Introduction

Reading of story “Racism and intolerance” by Louise Spilsbury Hanane Kai

Higher/lower order questioning of story  including listing examples of

Discussion of term racism, what it means, where does racism exist in the story and if it exists in real life.

 

 

 

Development

Walking debate: Scenarios of people disrespecting/respecting others identities will be read aloud. The children will have to move and stand beside the strongly agree,agree,neither agree nor disagree,disagree and strongly disagree signs depending on whether they agree/disagree with the statement.

Sample of scenarios include:

“There is a child of a different race playing in the playground on their own, it is okay to ignore them and play on their own because they look different”

The children will be asked why they are standing under the various headings.

Me too game:

A statement will be called out and each child that it applies to has to step forward and say “me too”. Many statements will be real aloud so that the children all say “me too” several times. Discussion will take place on how although we have many things in common we all have differences also and how it is important to respect each others differences.

Discussion will take place on how someone would feel if someone did not respect these differences and laughed, mocked or ignored them because of them. E.g. embarrassed,upset,ashamed,depressed etc.

Plenary

The children will work in pairs to write down reasons on why it is important to respect others identities. They will write these on sticky notes which they will stick on the board.

The sticky notes will be read aloud to recap on the importance of identity and respecting others individuality.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

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The Storm Whale – environmental care and artwork

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Topic: The Storm Whale – environmental care and artwork

Learning Outcomes

The child will be enabled to:

  • develop an awareness and understanding of the need to reduce waste and reuse and recycle materials to benefit the environment
  • debate on environmental issues

 

Introduction

‘The Storm Whale’ by Benji Davies

  • Show the cover of the book – ask for predictions – what will happen in the story?
  • Read the story ‘The Storm Whale’ to the class.

Development

Discussion and artwork

  • Ask the class to identify the key message(s) of the book.
  • Discuss the importance of looking after the environment and the animals who live in different habitats.
  • Examine the cover print in the book (showing the silhouettes of whales on a blue sea background).
  • On large sheets of paper, the children work in groups to paint a blue sea background.
  • Using potatoes and black paint, create whale-like shapes and print them on to the blue backdrop.
  • Add messages about the importance of animal and environmental care and display in the school corridor.

Plenary

Raising Awareness

  • At a school assembly, present the posters and explain the importance of environmental and animal care.
  • Display the posters around the school – on the Green Schools display board.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

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Birth of Guru Nanak

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Topic: Birth of Guru Nanak

Learning Outcomes

  • identify features of Sikhism
  • become aware of the life of Guru Nanak
  • learn about the teachings of Guru Nanak and why he is important to the Sikh religion

 

Introduction

Revise the basic of the Sikh religion using PowerPoints about features of the religion.

Development

Remind the class how other religions have people who lead celebrations e.g. priests, rabbis, etc….. In the Sikh religion, it is a guru who leads events and spreads the teachings of Sikhism. Through the years, some Guru have been remembered more than others for different reasons. Today, they will be looking at the life of Guru Nank and why he was so important to the Sikh people. He was the founder of the religion and his birth is remembered each year: https://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/sikhism/people/nanak.shtml

Share with the class different stories of the life of Guru Nanak: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yFaVHT2ZpV8

Plenary

Divide the class into groups and using Book Creator, create a project on Sikhism.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/introduction-to-sikhism-6377041

Book Creator for Sikhism project.

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Interview with a grandparent

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Topic: Interview with a grandparent

Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify key differences between school life in the past and present.
  2. Question grandparents about their favourite childhood memories.
  3. Predict what school life could be like in the future.

 

Introduction

Introduction

  • Study photographic evidence of school life in the past and present
  • Sort the photographs into their correct time periods in a venn diagram
  • Compare and contrast differences and similarities between the two
  • Co-construct interview questions with a partner for Grandparent’s Day

Development

Development

  • With the use of digital resources (“Talking photos” app on iPads) – the children will interview a grandparent using their prepared questions
  • The children will take photos during the interviews and layer the voice recording over it – all demonstrated on the app

Plenary

Conclusion

  • Class watch the clips and find similarities and differences between their lives and the lives of their grandparents

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

  • Talking photos app (or similar)
  • iPads

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Plastic Pollution

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Topic: Plastic Pollution

Learning Outcomes

The children will be enabled to:

  • Identify the different types of pollution and the effects it has on our environment
  • Discuss pollution and ways to prevent it

 

 

 

Introduction

  • The word pollution is written on the board and the children brainstorm what they think the word means. These ideas are written up around pollution in a spider diagram form.
  • The children are shown an age appropriate powerpoint on Pollution and the effects it has on the environment both on land and in the water
  • The powerpoint shown in the introduction is discussed. Questioning is used throughout.
  • Using different coloured marker on the board, the children add to their spider diagram to further develop their understanding of pollution

Development

 

  • The story ‘The Messy Magpie’ is read to the children and discussed in detail at the end. The children role play their reaction to the story in their groups using stick puppets from the story.
  • The children look at the role of the magpie and the role of people in the story. They decide who is more to blame, the people or the magpie? This is done as a group or think/pair/share activity and discussed afterwards as a whole class.
  • The children discuss the different dangers for the environment when plastic isn’t disposed of correctly. They are given a worksheet with 5 different boxes and they must draw five ways they can help the Earth

Plenary

  • The children in their groups are given A1/A3 card and are asked to create their own poster to prevent plastic pollution
  • The teacher writes key words up on the board to help the children with ideas and spelling.
  • They come up with their own slogan after certain ones are given as an idea.
  • They create a poster and this is shared with the class at the end

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://www.twinkl.ie/resource/t-l-54501-the-messy-magpie-ebook

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Tree Week (March)

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Topic: Tree Week (March)

Learning Outcomes

Pupils will be enabled to:

  • engage in seed collection projects and tree planting days
  • research and present work on the environment through computer presentations, video and wall displays.
  • identify trees in the locality of the school by leaves, seeds, etc.

 

Introduction

Pupils will use think-pair-share to list as many native Irish tree species as possible.

 

Development

Pupils will go on a tree trail to use iPads/digital cameras to photograph different tree species on the grounds of the school/the locality.

Where possible, pupils will collected leaves/seeds/etc. for a future Visual Art lesson.

On return to the classroom, pupils will use iPads to research facts about an assigned tree species.

Pupils will write a poem or design a poster about trees.

Plenary

Pupils will work in pairs/small groups using the app Book Creator to create short stories which might include: images, voice-overs, texts, etc.

Kahoot quiz in which pupils must try to identify tree species by pictures of leaves

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://create.kahoot.it/share/irish-trees/986c4b43-8d0b-4db9-9608-7ca445e52bc0

iPads for photograph, fact-finding, Book Creator app, Kahoot quiz (see link above)

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Loss of Species and habitats

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Topic: Loss of Species and habitats

Learning Outcomes

  • identify features of different habitats
  • identify dangers to habitats and species

 

Introduction

Think-pair-share different habitats that exist around the world. Create a list of these on the blackboard.

Development

Tell the class how some habitats in the world have become endangered for a number of different reasons. Brainstorm what could be a danger to the different habitats that have been listed earlier.

Present: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6QDk1c7fim8 to the class and see if they can identify the common element that exists in the loss of habitats i.e. human interaction.

Divide the class into groups and give each group a habitat to research. Tell the class to research what plants and animals exist in their chosen habitat and create a fact file on it.

When these have been created, get the groups to research what poses the greatest danger to their chosen habitat e.g. rainforest in danger of deforestation, ocean habitats in danger from pollution. When the main danger has been identified, the group can create an awareness poster that will be paired with their habitat factfile.

Plenary

When completed, each group can present their work to the class.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6QDk1c7fim8

Book Creator could be used in creating factfile.

Toontastic could be used to create a news report on the habitat destruction.

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Women who changed the world

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Topic: Women who changed the world

Learning Outcomes

The child will be enabled to:

    • begin to explore how people are interconnected and depend upon each other-the concept of interdependence,

 

Introduction

Explore the book ‘Fantastically Great Women Who Changed the World’

  • Read two/three extracts from the book ‘Fantastically Great Women Who Changed the World’.
  • Explain that women are often not valued as much as men for their hard work to change the world, and that sometimes their stories are not as well known. Today we will explore some of those stories.

Development

Jigsawing activity

  • Divide the class into groups of five – this will be their core group.
  • Explain that they will be journalists, who will go off and gather information about a woman who changed the world. They will then return to their core group and report back about what they learned.
  • Assign a number 1 – 5 to each group member.
  • All number 1s sit together, 2s together etc.
  • Give a different story to each group (photocopied from book or information gathered online) e.g. Frida Kahlo, Mary Anning, Amelia Earhart, Anne Frank and Marie Curie.
  • Each group is to read the story and write down three key facts.
  • They then return to their core groups and are given two minutes per person to report back on their gathered facts.

Plenary

Discussion

  • Circle time – each child tells one fact they learned about a woman who changed the world.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

Art activity – Frida Kahlo: discussion of her artwork and self-portrait in the style of her work.

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Navrati- Hinduism

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Topic: Navrati- Hinduism

Learning Outcomes

  • Discuss the celebration of Navrati of people who believe in Hinduism.
  • Identify the traditions engaged in during Navrati.
  • Design their own Navrati celebration outfit.

 

Introduction

Elicit prior knowledge from the children about Hinduism e.g. Where do Hindus go to worship? What celebrations take place in the Hindu tradition?

Show the children some pictures on the interactive whiteboard of places/ things associated with Hinduism- Gods/Goddesses, Diwali celebration, Hindu temple etc.

Complete a KWL chart with the class on the whiteboard based on what the children already know about Hinduism and what they would like to find out about Navrati.

Development

Present a PowerPoint on the interactive whiteboard about Navrati and its associated customs.

Children engage in a think-pair-share with a partner about what they have learned from the PowerPoint and whether it is similar to any tradition that they may follow or that they know about i.e. linking the custom of fasting to Lent in the Christian tradition.

Children relay what they have found out from the PowerPoint to the teacher and the class complete the KWL chart together.

Children are invited to design their own Navrati celebration outfit on white paper, being reminded that Navrati celebration outfits using consist of a variety of bright colours.

Plenary

Children present their Navrati celebration outfits to the class by means of the ‘artist’s chair’ activity.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://www.twinkl.ie/resource/t-re-246-navratri-powerpoint?sign_in=1

Interactive whiteboard

PowerPoint

Images

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Martin Luther King Day

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Topic: Martin Luther King Day

Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Argue and defend an issue they would like to see changed.
  2. Define, in their own words, what equality means to them.
  3. Compare and contrast equality issues in the 20th and 21st century.

 

Introduction

Introduction

  • Elicit prior knowledge from the children: “Have you heard of Martin Luther King?” “What can you tell the class about MLK?”
  • Start hot-seating game of 20 questions: Teacher in role as ML

Development

Development

  • Show the children a PowerPoint on MLK on the interactive whiteboard – and discuss
  • Watch the “I have a dream” clip on YouTube and discuss how back then MLK fought for racial equality (a problem at the time) and discuss what issues people fight to change nowadays
  • Think-pair-share: The children share some of their dreams regarding equality and justice
  • Children begin to draft their own “I have a dream” speech
  • When ready, children will be given the opportunity to record their speeches

Plenary

Conclusion

  • Class listen to each recorded speech and identify the issue being addressed

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vP4iY1TtS3s

  • Interactive whiteboard
  • Voice recorder app

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Life cycle of a Tree through the Seasons

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Topic: Life cycle of a Tree through the Seasons

Learning Outcomes

  • Identify what a tree looks like in each season: Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter.
  • Identify in which season shows buds growing on trees.
  • Identify in which season leaves fall from trees.

 

Introduction

Circle time: Use a talking piece.

Children name a fact they know about trees and take turns in talking.

Ask the children what they know about what happens to trees during each season.

 

Development

Children will go on a nature walk during the middle of each season around the school grounds.

In pairs, children take pictures (using an iPad) of a tree, in particular, its branches. Children talk about the stage of development in the tree: budding; leaves and flowers blooming, leaves changing colour and shedding of leaves to bare branches.

 

Children will take 4 pictures in total of the same tree from the same angle. The teacher will put them together and print them out for the pair groupings.

Plenary

Children will draw the difference of the tree’s cycle in each season in a grid layout.

Children will share their results and findings at the end of the year and discuss the differences with the whole class.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

Children use iPads to take pictures to record the progress of the life cycle of a tree.

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Autism awareness

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Topic: Autism awareness

Learning Outcomes

The child shall be enabled to:

  • further develop the concept of responsibility towards each other (Moral and Spiritual Development Strand)
  • explore rights and responsibilities in relation to the other children in the school and the contribution they can make to ensure these rights are upheld (Equality and Justice Strand)

 

Introduction

Circle Time Discussion:

  • Introduce the idea that we all have some things in common and that we are also unique.
  • What do we have in common?
  • What makes each of us unique?
  • Pass a speaking object around the circle and give each child an opportunity to answer each of these questions.

Development

Video about autism

  • Introduce the video – we will watch a video about how people view the world differently.
  • Show the video ‘Amazing Things Happen When’ : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbwRrVw-CRo
  • Think, pair share: ask the children to name one thing they learned from the video.
  • Explain that some people have autism which means they experience the world differently and can find some situations overwhelming.

Plenary

Ways to show respect for others

  • Brainstorm different ways we can show empathy and respect for people, particularly those with autism.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

Amazing Things Happen When video available on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbwRrVw-CRo

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When I’m feeling…. scared, happy, worried, loved

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Topic: When I’m feeling…. scared, happy, worried, loved

Learning Outcomes

  • recognise common feelings
  • match feelings to different situations and facial expression
  • create feelings word bank

 

Introduction

Think-pair-share to create a word bank of different feelings.

Introduce idea of different feelings using a feelings loop game.

Development

Get each child to take the feeling they had in the loop game and create their own picture to represent it. At the end, all the new illustrations will be put on a poster together with the feeling written on the back. It can then work as a flip chart to test for the different feelings.

The new illustrations could be used in a PowerPoint and work as a quiz also.

Plenary

At the end, each child presents their piece to their group/ to the class to describe what they created and see if others can match it to the feeling from the loop game.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://pdst.ie/sites/default/files/feelings%20loop%20games_0.doc

Using pictures as part of a PowerPoint.

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World Autism Day

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Topic: World Autism Day

Learning Outcomes

The children will:

  • understand that all sorts of people have autism.
  • design their own sensory relaxation box.
  • think about what is fair division of resources.

 

Introduction

The children will brainstorm what they already know about A.S.D. and questions that they have. Results could be recorded on a whiteboard.

Development

The children will learn that A.S.D. can effect:

  • how people socialise
  •  the senses (people can be over sensitive or under sensitive)

Children will learn that this means some people with A.S.D. will needs lots of alone time, others will not. Some people with A.S.D. may talk lots, others may communicate in different ways. (e.g. Ipads or PECS)

They children will explore the sensory aspect to ASD though designing their own relaxation box. They will think about their own sensory preferences. The children will be told that some people need to feed their senses and others need sensory breaks.

Plenary

The children will gradually view the image of 3 children trying to see a baseball match. This will begin a discussion about how we can make our everyday environment/behaviour more Autism-Friendly.

 

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://asiam.ie/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/relaxation-box.jpg

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One Plastic Bag

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Topic: One Plastic Bag

Learning Outcomes

The child should be enabled to

  • Locate Gambia on a map.
  • Know that developing countries and developed countries exist.
  • Understand the main differences between developing countries and developed countries.
  • Understand that people’s actions impact the environment, positively and negatively.
  • Identify current threats to our environment.
  • Explore ways that their actions can make a difference to environmental threats.
  • Understand that often a systematic change is needed.

 

 

Introduction

Locate Gambia on the map.

Elicit prior knowledge around the concept of developing world and developed world.

In groups children record their ideas about what the  developing world is and  what the developed world is.

Discuss each other’s ideas.

Explain that there is no one agreed definition of what a developing country is, developed countries are socially and economically advanced. Developing countries do not enjoy the same advances, aspects of their country are still developing and they are poorer.

In groups children discuss the kind of challenges that people in the developing world might face.

Development

Introduce the story.

Ask children to pay close attention to the challenges that Isatou and the women of the village are facing and how they overcome this challenge.

Read the story, One Plastic Bag to the class.

Think- Pair- Share discussions answering four questions:

  1. What happens in the story to encourage Isatou and her friends to make a change?
  2. Why did they not see the plastic as a problem before?
  3.  What did the women do about the rubbish problem?
  4. Do you think their solution will solve the problem permanently?

Plenary

Inform the children of the impact of the plastic bag levy on our society.

Class discussion are there similar issues in our society now that require a fundamental change e.g single plastic use?

Children finish sentence starters.

I see……….. as a threat to environment.

 

I can……… to help change this…….

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

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SALT Programme

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Web Site: SALT Programme

About this site / Ideas for this site

The S.A.L.T. Programme is an innovative programme, specially developed for the Irish and UK School Curriculum and is aligned to the key strands of the SPHE (Primary) Programme: Myself, Myself and Others, Relating to Others,Myself and the World. Through The S.A.L.T. Programme, children will learn what conflict is, what it feels like to be in conflict and how to negotiate effectively to create a better outcome for themselves and others. The programme focuses on building each child’s capacity to develop and access their own skills set when dealing with difficult and sometimes emotional situations. (From SALT Programme)

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Tom Crean’s Rabbit

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Name of Book: Tom Crean’s Rabbit

Meredith Hooper & Bert Kitchen

Link to Book: http://www.books.ie/tom-crean-s-rabbit

Ideas for this book

Seomra Ranga has some good ideas for this book, as well as a review:

  • https://www.seomraranga.com/2017/08/tom-creans-rabbit-resources/
  • https://www.seomraranga.com/2009/09/tom-creans-rabbit/
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National Geographic confronts its racist past.

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Topic: National Geographic confronts its racist past.

Learning Outcomes

Equality and Justice

Promoting Equality

Critically evaluate media coverage of equality and justice issues

 

Introduction

Development

Plenary

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/04/from-the-editor-race-racism-history/

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Conflict Resolution- Little Red Riding Hood

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Topic: Conflict Resolution- Little Red Riding Hood

Learning Outcomes

  • develop and create an awareness of core values such as co-operation, freedom, happiness, honesty, love, peace, respect, responsibility, kindness, caring, safety and security in a peaceful and tranquil environment.
  • foster the development of peaceful, co-operative social skills, through stories, songs, games and movement.

 

Introduction

  • the children re-tell the story of “Little  Red Riding Hood” in their own words using visual aids.

Development

  • the children will begin to analyse the conflict present in the story, i.e. the wolf wanted to eat Little Red Riding Hood, she didn’t want to be eaten.
  • T&D: the children consider what would make both characters happy
  • T&D: the children try to establish common ground/shared goal between the wolf and Little Red Riding Hood, i.e. both have been hungry at times, both are happy when they have eaten
  • T&D, Group Work: the children try to find a win-win solution by focusing on the wants of each character (if the class could find an alternative meal for the wolf, it may solve the problem!)

*Share, whole class: the children will share their views and opinions throughout talk and discussion

Plenary

  • Teacher in role: the teacher will be in role as the wolf. The children will present their views and findings to the wolf in an attempt to solve the conflict

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

Book Creator: the app can be used to re-tell the story with the conflict resolved.

*The children will be familiar with this story from prior teaching before engaging with this lesson

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Hannukah-Channukah

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Topic: Hannukah-Channukah

Learning Outcomes

Celebrations

  • listen to and experience the sound and music used by major religions to celebrate their faith
  • look at and respond to the differing art forms associated with festivals-Hannukah

 

Introduction

Development

  • Get children to recap on above in pairs. Have students work together or individually to create a timeline of the story and celebrations of Hanukkah. Students should start their timeline when the second temple was being built and continue it through to today. They should include the story of the oil, the dates of when it became a national holiday in Israel and in America, and when the different aspects of the celebration were introduced.

Plenary

Sing the song, Dredeil. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETPlDKT4hdM

Extension: Make a dreidel-use template on card. Use chocolate coins for gelt.

https://legacyproject.org/holidaykit/part2/dreidel.pdf

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

Youtube video-

Read write think.org Timeline maker-A really good online tool where children can make their own timeline and save, print and edit. http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/student-interactives/timeline-30007.html

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Anti-bullying, Rights and Responsibilities, tie in with UN Rights of the Child

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Topic: Anti-bullying, Rights and Responsibilities, tie in with UN Rights of the Child

Learning Outcomes

The child shall be enabled to:

  1. begin to distinguish the difference between wants and needs.
  2. identify and name basic rights e.g. the right to food, water, shelter, health, play, to be safe, not to be hurt etc.

 

Introduction

  1. Begin by introducing the WALT/TAFF by stating that today we are learning about children’s rights
  2. Start the lesson by introducing the concept of rights by stating that ‘rights are things that all people should have and be able to do everyday’.
  3. Allow the children the opportunity to give some examples before stating them aloud for the class: clean water, food, love, play, opinions etc
  4. Have the children gather in a circle. Using a prompt statement “We have the right to…..’ support the children to think of the rights they have or what they think the rights of all children are.
  5. Use a beanbag to pass from one student to the next, each stating a right they think all children have/should have.
  6. The teacher at this time should record their answers on a flipchart.
  7. Encourage open conversation in the class at this time, highlighting common rights or themes emerging from their work. The following are prompts that may encourage children to identify the links or themes themselves. (How many answers had something to do with learning, home, family, feeling safe).
  8. Encourage children to speak openly stating if they agree or disagree with the answers given in class.

Development

  1. In groups of fours or fives, have the children create a list of rights they believe each child should have under the title “Children have a right to….”
  2. Once complete, have the children place their A3 sheet of paper on a table. Encourage them to circulate the room, reading the lists while listening to some background music.
  3. Once the music is paused the children must sit at the table closest to them. This should be a different table from where they started.
  4. Each new group must now examine the rights written on the A3 sheet and decide whether or not they should add to the list.
  5. The music should be played several times, allowing the children to sit at a different table each time.
  6. With the teacher as facilitator, record an agreed class list of children’s rights. This should be based on the children’s work.

Plenary

  1. Display the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in the class. Explain to the children, that similar to what we have done today in class, countries all over the world have an agreed list of children’s rights.
  2. Using the Interactive White Board open the PDF of the poster available on the OCO’S website.
  3. Encourage the children to compare their collective class list of children’s rights with the rights listed on the poster. Questions such as “What rights are on our class list that we can’t see on the poster?”  “What rights are on the poster that are not on our class list? If so, what are they and should we add them to our class list?
  4. Reflect on the questions ‘What have we learned?’ and ‘What would we like to learn more about?’ addressing the WALT/TAFF. 

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

IWB to display the UN rights of the Child

iPads to look up the definition of rights and children’s rights

Use the IWB to display examples of the children’s lists/new rights that had not been previously identified or discussed in the lesson.

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Fairtrade (Fortnight – to be completed over 2 lessons)

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Topic: Fairtrade (Fortnight – to be completed over 2 lessons)

Learning Outcomes

The child shall be enabled to:

  • Realise that not all children in the world have their rights respected
  • Discuss, analyse and debate controversial issues at both local and global level
  • Actively support fair trade
  • Become more aware of and empathise with the different working conditions of people throughout the world

 

Introduction

Ask the children what did they eat for breakfast?

List the possibilities on the whiteboard. Elicit where these products came from, what country were they grown in? Elicit that ‘before you’ve finished your breakfast this morning, you’ll have relied on half the world’.

 

 

Development

Step 1: Who produces all this food and where? Read the producer profile of ‘Sivapackiam’ (attached) to the children. Invite the children to listen. As I read, we will have a class discussion and questioning about World Trade of such foods and their growers. 

  • What is this profile about? 
  • What views are shown? 
  • How do you think this lady feels? 
  • What work does she do?  
  • Is it healthy? Why/why not? 
  • Does she make a lot of money?
  • But tea is expensive to buy, why does she not make money?
  • Who makes the money? Is this fair? 

 

Step 2: Elicit from the children the meaning of Fair Trade. What do you think Fairtrade means? I will read a short piece about the work of Fairtrade Ireland. 

I will show the children a PowerPoint presentation of products with the Fairtrade mark on them. I will try to elicit where in the world these products may have originated from. Use of google maps/online atlas’ so as to locate the country of the product.

 

Step 3: Pairwork – Discuss in pairs how they would feel if they: 

  • was a young worker picking tea leaves.
  •  start work at half past four in the morning and will finish work at three o’ clock the next morning. 
  • earn 8cent an hour and will have one break at one o’clock the next day. 
  • work carrying kilos and kilos of tealeaves everyday 

 

Step 4: The teacher gives the children a chance to prepare a possible conversation, one as the worker, the other as a news reporter. The news reporter must carry out an interview with the worker about his life picking tea, and how things could be improved. Sample questions for the reporter may include; 

  • how he/she feels as a worker. 
  • How do you feel? 
  • what type of work do you do? 
  • Have you a family? 
  • Why do you not stop working here?

 

Step 5:  To stimulate a discussion on the topic of interdependence, I will re-introduce the quotation at the beginning from Martin Luther King- “Before you finish eating your breakfast this morning you’ve depended on half the world. . . . I will introduce who said this famous line.

I will state that ‘We aren’t going to have peace on earth until we recognize this basic fact.” 

The teacher then asks the students to think about all the foods that we would not have in Ireland if it were not for the Third World – tea, coffee, sugar, chocolate, bananas, pineapples, oranges, rice, etc. 

The teacher should draw the students’ attention to how dependent we in the First World are on the people of the Third World in terms of food, and how producers in the Third World depend on First World markets for their products. The common term for this fact is called ‘interdependence’. This word will be written on a flashcard and displayed on the board, with it’s meaning being made clear to the children. 

Plenary

HP Reveal (using iPads – teacher will need a login): the children will carry out a scavenger hunt of different pictures of supermarket items hidden around the room. As they find the pictures of the items, they report back to the various ICT managers, who then scans the item and reveals whether it is a Fairtrade item or not. Each group must try and collect the most amount of Fairtade items as possible.

 

Fairtrade Globingo:

Using worksheets: each student must find 10 different people to supply an answer until all questions are completed.  Students need to be able to move around the class in order to find 10 different names to fill in the bingo squares. The first to complete calls out, Globingo! and is designated the winner of the game. However, all students continue until each completes the worksheet. 

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

HP Reveal

Use of iPads

Use of Google Maps/online Atlas

Powerpoint Presentation

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Conflict Resolution

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Topic: Conflict Resolution

Learning Outcomes

Students will be enabled to:

  • Explore and identify different types of conflict
  • Distinguish between positive and negative responses to situations involving conflict
  • Participate in a group task designed to promote positive conflict resolution
  • Perform a short drama to demonstrate positive conflict resolution

 

Introduction

Students will complete a group word spill of vocabulary related to conflict. Students should have one minute to pair-share prior to completing the task.

Development

Students should be placed into groups of no more than four. Each group will be given a scenario card detailing a situation involving conflict between fictional characters.

Groups should be encouraged to brainstorm positive responses to the scenario on their cards. Teacher should walk around and ensure students have formed an appropriate response prior to the conclusion activity.

Plenary

In their groups, students will be given time to develop a short drama to demonstrate their chosen response to their conflict situation. The teacher should pause the dramas at various points and ask the students to predict a suitable resolution of each groups conflict.

Students will perform their demonstrations for the class. Teacher will initiate follow-up discussions after each response.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://www.twinkl.ie/resource/t-t-4096-bullying-scenario-discussion-cards

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Identity and Individuality (Moral and Spiritual Development) SI

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Topic: Identity and Individuality (Moral and Spiritual Development) SI

Learning Outcomes

  • To explore Identity and Individuality through story “Giraffes Can’t Dance” by Giles Andreae,
  • To discuss the giraffe’s  individual talents as a dancer and talk about pupils’ own individual talents,
  • To discuss the giraffe’s feelings throughout the story (from feeling ashamed/embarrassed/sad at not dancing in the same style as the other animals to feeling proud/joyful/happy with his own dance).

 

Introduction

  • Begin the lesson with Circle Time, asking each child, while holding the Speaking Object, to name one thing that he/she is good at (if they wish to participate),
  • Tell the children we will listen to a story about a giraffe who feels sad because he thinks he cannot dance like the other animals,
  • Listen  the story “Giraffes Can’t Dance” by Giles Andreae (teacher reads book or see animations/story being read aloud .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZjsLK5vwNU )

Development

  • Discuss the story through questioning – how did Gerald feel when his knees buckled?  how did Gerald feel about the Jungle Dance?, how would you feel if you were Gerald?Should the other animals have been laughing at Gerald? Do you think the cricket had good advice for Gerald? Can you remember what he said?
  • “Sometimes when you’re different, you just need a different song”- open up discussion on what this means (individuality) and associate it with children’s own lives (e.g., we all have different shoe sizes for different foot sizes, each of us has individual tastes like favourite colours, favourite TV programme etc.) – we are all different and unique.
  • Relate own discussion to Gerald – Gerald danced beautifully to different music but found the music of the Jungle Dance difficult to dance to.

Plenary

  • Encourage each pupil to choose his/her own favourite part of the story and illustrate it,
  • Discuss why it was your favourite part,
  • Recap on what Individuality means.

 

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

See animation of story

Integration with Literacy (rhyming words)

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Naming ceremonies (Christianity, Buddhism and Hinduism)

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Topic: Naming ceremonies (Christianity, Buddhism and Hinduism)

Learning Outcomes

Exploring the rites and ceremonies associated with a variety of belief systems:

-To explore the rites and naming ceremonies associated with various religions (Christianity, Buddhism and Hinduism)

 

Introduction

Christianity: To introduce the lesson, I will ask a few of the children their names, I will then ask them where they got their names from and if  they celebrated it (to elicit baptism etc.) I will then begin to discuss how special and important our names are to us. I will share with  the children that I am named after my Aunt. The children will share any stories they have about where their name comes from and if they have any nicknames with a partner and then report back to the class.

Buddhist welcoming ceremony: Recap baptism and then introduce the Buddhist welcoming ceremony *see PowerPoint for info*

Hinduism naming ceremony (Namkaran) : Recap baptism and the Buddhist welcoming ceremony, introduce the Namkaran ceremony *see PowerPoint for info*.

Development

-Identify differences and similarities (baptism and Buddhist welcoming ceremony)

-Identify similarities and differences for all 3 ceremonies

-Activity during development:

Christianity – making name leaves

Buddhism- creating prayer flags

Hinduism-  designing mandalas

*see PowerPoint for info*

Plenary

Recap the main focus of each ceremony and the similarities/differences of each.

Display name leaves, prayer flags and mandalas as part of your Croi na Scoile classroom display along with objects associated with the naming ceremonies (baptism candle, sugar/honey pot, holy water etc)

 

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

PowerPoint link for 3 naming ceremonies:

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/e/2PACX-1vQeRhHvXEyD7EHfT4hR2LHMMaJZ-zEH4M1l4ppFNnWVCcJwYB_W7mHwatMSm6Zayw/pub?start=false&loop=false&delayms=3000

 

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Exploring habitats in the local environment

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Topic: Exploring habitats in the local environment

Learning Outcomes

  • The children will be enabled to look for, catch, identify and draw  different insects, found in various areas of the school grounds.
  • Children will identify the various areas around the school discussing where insects could be found.
  • The children will be introduced to a variety of different insects in  the classroom, noting the amount of legs, or identifying features, i.e wings etc.,
  • Then go on an outdoor hunt using the pooters, draw their bug, then release the bug, return to their class and try to identify them using images on the whiteboard.
  • Identify their bugs according to information sheets see link below.

 

Introduction

  • KWL : ask what insects/bugs the children can identify. How do they know it’s a spider not a fly etc.
  • Discuss the identifying features as seen on information cards available at https://www.twinkl.ie/resource/t2-s-1169-insect-information-cards
  • Brainstorm where  around the school we would most likely find bugs/creatures .
  • Introduce pooters, explain how to use them (which straw to suck on, not to share them etc)
  • Remind children to work with partner.

Development

  • Children work in pairs to  explore their chosen area on school grounds, e.g  grass, puddles, under stones, in grass, (around bug hotels, or in raised beds if applicable. )
  • Children look for bugs, drawing ones that still enough to draw, eg snails, worms, ladybirds butterflies etc.
  • Use pooters to examine smaller bugs like louse or small spiders,  draw what they see under the  magnified lens.

Plenary

  • Children collect all items, ensure all bugs have been released.
  • Return to the class room, using their own sketches, refer to the bug information cards again to identify the species.
  • Using the link to Irish wildlife. ie children can identify a particular type of species e.g butterflies.
  • Children discuss their findings  in the class, and walk around looking at each pairs drawn images to see if they can idetnify more.
  • Complete KWL and discuss findings.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://www.twinkl.ie/resource/t2-s-1169-insect-information-cards

http://www.irishwildlife.ie/insects.html

lesson suggests pooters, they are not vital, the lesson can be done easily with free insects.

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Climate Change 4th Class

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Topic: Climate Change 4th Class

Learning Outcomes

Climate Change outcomes:

The child shall be enabled to:

  •  understand the impact of the actions of people on the environment through the generations
  • explore how we can enhance our environment for future generations through energy conservation, tree planting, preservation of habitats
  • further develop the concept of waste management through creating awareness of the Bring Centres, Green Bins and recycling areas in the school.
  • discover ways to move towards an environmentally friendly lifestyle such as turning off lights, reducing the amount of water used, recycling paper in the classroom and home
  • debate on environmental issues
  • become involved in local community clean up days/ anti-litter campaigns
  • research and present work on the environment through computer presentations, video and wall displays. 

 

Introduction

KWL : Walking debate to begin to get an insight of children’s initial ideas/ beliefs/ understanding. Use this time to address any misconceptions which may arise.

Teacher will call out facts/myths about climate change and chn must position themselves by signs around the room: agree, disagree, unsure.

  1. Climate change is caused by the sun. (this website expands on this: https://www.climatechange.ie/myth-buster/ )
  2. Today the planet is warming much faster than it has over human history.
  3. Burning fossil fuels impact on climate change.
  4. Climate change means that the earth is warming up.
  5. One way to decrease rate of climate change is to plant more trees.

Following this, groups to brainstorm what they know about climate change already. Teacher prompts: What does this mean? Who does it affect? How can we help?

 

 

 

 

Development

At this point- progress check- can chn add to their brainstorm sheet.

Explain main task: chn to do peer teaching.  Give groups a section to research. (Provide suitable QR codes to scan to selected websites- differentiate here). Chn research and then present their findings to class.  ‘Audience’ to add to their brainstorm after each presentation.

  1. What is it?
  2. Causes?
  3. Impact on us every day?
  4. Steps we can take to help?

 

Following this, ICT link: https://vimeo.com/112042837to recap and summarise the lesson.

Plenary

Using padlet.com  https://padlet.com/dashboard(teacher will need an account) chn can add to the class wall in pairs using theirs iPads.

Chn scan the QR code shown on the board to access the padlet created by the teacher and summarise their learning from this lesson.   This will be the L for our KWL.  Ipads per pair needed.

 

Teacher displays the padlet as live summaries are added and uses this to address any misconceptions which may still arise or to consolidate new learning.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

Use of padlet- https://padlet.com/dashboard

Video:  https://vimeo.com/112042837

Use of iPads to research with QR codes.

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Guided Meditation (Buddhism)

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Topic: Guided Meditation (Buddhism)

Learning Outcomes

The child will be enabled to:

  • Understand the main beliefs of Buddhism
  • Observe and discuss important Buddhist symbols
  • Become aware of meditation as a key practice of Buddhists
  • Explore and discuss the story of Buddha/origin of Buddhism
  • Participate in the guided Lotus meditation

 

Introduction

Students will participate in a mystery picture quiz to arouse their interest in the topic.

A total of three pictures will be used for the introduction.

Teacher will assist in identifying and using specific vocabulary to describe the pictures following the quiz; Buddhha statue, Lotus flower, and temple.

Development

Students will listen to the story of Buddha and discuss. Following the story, students can complete a drawing activity of the main symbols of Buddhism covered in the power-point.

Teacher should ensure the significance of the main symbols of Buddhism are highlighted regularly throughout and after the story.

 

Plenary

Students will complete a guided Lotus meditation under instruction from the teacher.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

www.buddhanet.net for Lotus Meditation

 

https://www.twinkl.ie/resource/t2-re-556-ks2-buddhism-activity-powerpoint

Note: It should be made clear that Buddhism is a non-deity belief system.

Students should briefly introduced to the concept of Karma and Dharma

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Grandparents day

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Topic: Grandparents day

Learning Outcomes

To appreciate the role of grandparents in a child’s life

To make comparisons between school life in the past and the present

To celebrate the accomplishments and contributions of senior citizens

 

Introduction

Show photos / video clips of past school classroom items, uniforms etc. Ask children to compare this to our own school and classroom, what are the similarities and differences? Ask children how we could find out more about what school life was like in the past. Elicit that we could interview our grandparents.

Development

Create a KWL chart with the children about school in the past. Use this to choose questions that they would like to ask their grandparents on grandparents day.

 

Plenary

Children write and share their favourite things to do with their grandparents.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

Photographs and videos of past classroom items.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xxTzU7tGqYw

Use of I-pads to record questions or favourite memories to show grandparents on Grandparent’s day.

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Christmas

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Topic: Christmas

Learning Outcomes

This is a lesson about the nativity where infants can learn about the story of the first Christmas.

 

Introduction

Introduce the lesson by asking the children what special time of year is coming up soon. Discuss some traditions and customs associated with Christmas e.g. Santa, presents, food, snow, reindeer etc. Ask the children if they know what happened at the very first Christmas. Create a KWL chart on the whiteboard or interactive screen.

Development

When the KWL chart is completed, tell the class that the story of the first Christmas happened over 2,000 years ago when a baby called Jesus was born. Read the class the story of the Nativity. Afterwards, discuss the sequence of the story and give the children sequencing cards to complete in small groups or pairs.

Plenary

After the sequencing activity, revisit the KWL chart and fill out the ‘What we have Learned’ section.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

Interactive KWL chart https://awwapp.com/info/business-templates/k-w-l-charts/

Christmas story powerpoint https://www.twinkl.ie/resource/t-t-4790-the-nativity-christmas-story-powerpoint

Christmas story sequencing cards https://www.twinkl.ie/resource/t-re-240-christmas-story-sequencing

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Belief Systems – Humanism

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Topic: Belief Systems – Humanism

Learning Outcomes

 

  • To identify key values associated with Humanism.

  • To appreciate that Humanists believe they have a responsibility of stewardship towards the environment.

 

Introduction

To begin the lesson I will write on the board what we are going to learn today;

  • Explain what it means to be a Humanist

  • List our senses and explain why they are important

  • Discuss how people use their senses to find out about their surroundings and themselves

  • Describe how different senses result in different information

At the end of the lesson I will refer back to what we have written on the board. This part of the lesson will be supported by a short YouTube clip on the five senses. 

Development

The children will then be divided into pairs, where they will discuss images that the teacher has already prepared. The children will discuss images of the natural environment and human-made resources.

Natural: Do you like swimming in the sea during the summer? Do you like going for nature walks? Playing in the sand at the beach? Watching wild animals? Climbing trees in the countryside?

Human-made: Going to the playground / swimming pool? Playing sports with their friends on astro-turf? Going to a theme park?

Once discussion time has ended, the children will then be asked to report back on their partner’s favourite activities and past times.

Plenary

To conclude the lesson the children will be reminded that Humanists celebrate the common links between people, the environment and the importance of taking care of our world.

Teacher will ask the class:

  • Why should people protect our natural and human-made environments?

  • Are humanists the only people who protect the earth?

  • Can you think of any ways the natural environment and natural resources are being destroyed?

  • What would happen if we used or destroyed all our natural resources or neglected our human made resources?

Once we have concluded this discussion, teacher gives the children a template for

an acrostic poem titled “EARTH”. The children are encouraged to complete a

poem using today’s Humanist teaching point as their focus (Exit Pass Activity).

Finally, we will return to the objectives written on the board at the beginning of our lesson and using thumbs up and thumbs down assessment tool we will tick off the objectives on the board.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

Five senses – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1xNuU7gaAQ

Natural structures v man made structure – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jh3wLR-bG-I

Integration:

  • SPHE: Myself and the Wider World/Environmental Care

  • Science: Environmental Awareness and Care

  • Geography: Environmental Awareness and Care

Differentiation: Pair work may be more suitable for some children.

Lower order questioning:

  • How would you feel if every swing was broken in your local playground?

  • Why is it important to respect property and nature?

Higher order questioning:

  • How should we have a duty to care for the environment and the world?

  • What would happen if we neglected the environment?

Assessment:

  • Teacher observation

  • Teacher’s questions/Children’s questions

  • Work samples (Acrostic poem)

  • Exit Pass activity

  • No hands up (All learners are expected to contribute and all answers valued. Teacher may select any pupil, therefore all pupils need to frame answer in their head).

  • Thumbs up and thumbs down.

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Humanism – Summer Solstice June 21st

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Topic: Humanism – Summer Solstice June 21st

Learning Outcomes

To develop an understanding and appreciation of an event that is of particular significance to Humanist religion.
Identify and discuss famous features in Ireland and abroad that are related to the summer solstice.

 

Introduction

Introduce the Summer solstice, the date of the 21st of June and why it is of significance.
Discuss the relevance of it being the longest day of the year and compare it with the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year. Represent the solistice as a cycle that repeats annually.

https://study.com/academy/lesson/summer-solstice-lesson-for-kids.html

Website can be used as a prompt to learn about the basics of the Summer solstice.

Development

Group work:

Break the children into groups and assign them a task to research famous features that celebrate the summer solstice.
The groups will be looking  up two different places; Newgrange and Stonehenge.

The group who are researching Newgrange can use this website and youtube video to conduct their research;

https://easyscienceforkids.com/newgrange-facts/

Children who are researching Stonehenge can use this website and video to conduct their research;

Stonehenge Facts!

Each group will present their research to the class using a poster or record a short video presentation on iPads.

places

Plenary

The lesson can then be linked to the religion of Humanism by acknowledging that World Humanism Day is celebrated on the 21st of June. A discussion on the meaning of the summer solstice and the core values of humanism.

This video may be used by the teacher to attain some knowledge on the day or else be shown to the children.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DoaC0cWfneM

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

use of websites, videos and iPads.

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Moral & Spiritual – When I’m Feeling …

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Topic: Moral & Spiritual – When I’m Feeling …

Learning Outcomes

To gain an understanding of feelings and how best to cope with them. To understand how your body and mind reacts when experiencing these feelings.

 

Introduction

Gather children in a circle. Ask children on a scale of 1 to 10 (1 being the lowest and 10 being the highest) how they are feeling today by passing around the talking stick.

Once finished, explain to the children that today we will be focusing on feelings.

Talk through all the different feelings there are and in what circumstances we would experience them.

Development

Read through scenario cards to the children where they will select/write down what emotion/feeling they associate with the scenario. The children will discuss where they feel/how their body feels with the different emotions.

The class will discuss how we should cope with these feelings and manage them.

Plenary

Children will complete an activity sheet of matching feelings to reactions and also watch a video and answer the questions as the video presents them e.g. how is the character feeling?

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOkyKyVFnSs

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Poverty

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Topic: Poverty

Learning Outcomes

  • To gain an understanding of what it means to be ‘homeless’
  • To gain an appreciation for the difficult decisions that homeless people sometimes have to make
  • To recognise the various ways in which the public can help to combat homelessness

 

Introduction

The teacher will ask the class to explain what they think of when they hear the word ‘home’.

Having made a web diagram of all of the words on the board, the teacher will ask each of the children if any of the words resonates with them specifically.

A KWL chart will be created.

The teacher will also ask the children questions surrounding the topic of homelessness, such as:

What is homelessness?

How do people become homeless (do you think?)

How do you think you might feel if you were to lose your home?

Development

The children will watch a video focusing on homelessness from a child’s perspective: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UQEoiPajc8

The children will discuss their thoughts on the video afterwards and the teacher will ask questions regarding the video also.

Separately, the children will complete a worksheet, which will elicit answers to some of the following questions:

  • How did the boy in the video become homeless?
  • How did he feel when he lost his home, do you think?
  • What do you think he misses about his home?
  • Are any human rights being neglected in this video?
  • Is this boy’s homelessness permanent do you think?

Plenary

Again discuss with the class, their feelings if they were to be made homeless. The teacher would also ask the children to explore what they could do to help people whom are homeless, and perhaps also suggest what other’s can do to help people whom are homeless.

The KWL Chart will be revisited and updated based on the learning that has taken place.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

  • YouTube – The video used during the development of the lesson will be from youtube.com
  • The worksheet can optionally be interactive on Google Forms

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If the World was only 100 people

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Topic: If the World was only 100 people

Learning Outcomes

For student to be able to identify lacks of equality and justice around the world.

For students to be able to emphasise and understand why this occurs in our world.

For students to be able to discuss the difference and similarities between their community and the community of others

For students to reflect on how they can make a difference and make an improvement to others lives

 

Introduction

Students discuss different aspects of their society – ‘What makes up our society?’

‘What would we expect to see/hear in our society?’

Students discuss aspects of a third world society- ‘What would you expect to see/hear in a third world society?’

What could be different/same?

Students can design a Venn Diagram to show their thoughts.

 

Development

Students watch the ‘If the World was only 100 people’ video on Youtube

Teacher leads discussion of what they have seen.

Students reflect on different issues that have came forward from the video….student interest lead.

Plenary

In pairs or small group students can prepare a ‘notice poster’ or google slide of a social justice issue which has came from the video/discussion.

Children research their own topics and gather information to explain the why/how something occurs differently is all society.

Teacher could also integrate drama by having role playing. I have even had students prepare a ‘shadow dance’ where students prepare an explanation dance behind a curtain. Music is usually used to add an extra impact.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

If the world was only 100 people – video or book form -Youtube

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Day of the dead

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Topic: Day of the dead

Learning Outcomes

-understand the purpose and joy of celebration

-explore special celebrations that we share with others such as birthdays

-begin to explore festivals in different cultures

-examine the art and music associated with the celebration of these festivals

 

Introduction

Talk about Hallow’een and how we celebrate halloween in Ireland. Talk about Samhain and how it started the tradition of Hallow’een in Ireland.

Brainstorm if anyone know any other traditions which are similar to Hallow’een.

Development

Explore day of the dead. Explain that it is a Mexican festival and in Mexican culture death is viewed as a natural part of the human cycle. Mexicans view it not as a day of sadness but as a day of celebration because their loved ones awake and celebrate with them. Talk to the class about the festival and how people create alters to celebrate the dead and serve traditional meals.

Look at the pictures on line of day of the dead, focusing on the decorative work on the face, and explore the celebrations during the festival. Look in particular at the masks that people wear during the parades.

Class to design their own day of the dead masks.

Plenary

Compare the traditions of Day of the Dead to Hallow’een- how are they similar and different?

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

use google/ecosia for images of the day of the dead

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Child labour

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Topic: Child labour

Learning Outcomes

Children will look at photographs of children around the world

They will compare and contrast the photos-the school, the food, the clothes etc.

Children will look at videos and discuss what child labour is and what should be done to prevent it

 

Introduction

Children will watch the video Fruits of their Labour

Development

After this video the children will learn its a video from Amnesty International and will research online what Amnesty International is and what they do.

They will create a storyboard of a day in the life of a person in the plantation.

 

Plenary

Children will write a letter to companies who use palm oil and try to deter them from using it, outlining their reasons why they should not use palm oil and give alternatives.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

storyboard

youtube story

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Feeling Safe

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Topic: Feeling Safe

Learning Outcomes

The children will be enabled to identify what makes them feel safe.

The children will be enabled to identify what makes them feel unsafe.

The children will discuss what to do in an unsafe situation.

 

Introduction

The Child Centred Principle: Each child’s individual needs will be considered and they will be encouraged to learn through active participation.

The children will discuss how they are feeling, this will lead onto the children discussing what makes them safe/unsafe.

The children will listen to a story during circle time, where a child will get lost from their mother in a shopping centre.

 

Development

After discussing various situations, the children will act out various scenes in groups.

The rest of the class will watch and assess using the “Three Stars and a Wish”, picking out two of the best parts and one that can be improved.

All children will be involved actively in a drama and class discussion.

Plenary

The class will have a whole class discussion on feeling safe.

 

Other Resources for teaching this topic

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzb40S8AnuU

The children will watch a Youtube clip on feeling happy and safe.